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Tibial Osteotomy with Open Wedge

If osteoarthritis has caused damage on only one side of your knee, read this article:

Tibial Osteotomy with Open Wedge
Tibial Osteotomy with Open Wedge

What is Tibial Osteotomy with Open Wedge?

If osteoarthritis has caused damage on only one side of the knee joint, it can cause structural issues. Tibial osteotomy with open wedge is a procedure used to shift pressure off of the damaged side of the knee joint. This is accomplished by cutting and realigning the tibia to shift the pressure to the healthier side of the joint.

Who needs Tibial Osteotomy with Open Wedge?

This procedure is used to treat patients with osteoarthritis in the knee that has only affected one side of the knee. This condition can be painful and affect mobility and normal functioning of the knee. Your doctor may recommend this procedure if your condition does not respond to more conservative treatments, like bracing.

What are the steps in Tibial Osteotomy with Open Wedge?

Before the Surgery

The patient's knee if positioned so that the surgeon has clear access to it. General anesthesia is applied, and the knee area is cleaned and sterilized in preparation for the procedure.

Accessing the Knee

The surgeon makes an incision on the front or inner side of the knee. This allows access to the tibia and knee joint, which the surgeon uses to examine the joint.

Tibia Realignment

The surgeon cuts into the tibia at an angle, separating the two sides to form a wedge-shaped opening, which is then filled with bone graft material. The surgeon then inserts a metal plate, which is attached with surgical screws, to help hold open the wedge during the healing process.

End of Procedure

The surgeon then closes the incisions with surgical staples or sutures. The leg is then placed in a split.

After Surgery

This procedure may require a one to two day hospital stay. During this time, patients will receive physical therapy. Immobilization devices like a knee brace or crutches may be recommended for the patient to use for up to six weeks.