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Adult Acquired Flatfoot

Are you at risk for Adult Acquired Flatfoot? Learn about risk factors here:

Adult Acquired Flatfoot
Adult Acquired Flatfoot

What is Adult Acquired Flatfoot

Next time you're barefoot, take a look at the arch of your foot. Typically, tendons and ligaments work together to hold up your arch. Over time, those structures can slowly collapse, resulting in adult acquired flatfoot.

What causes Adult Acquired Flatfoot?

The posterior tibial tendon, which connects the bones inside the foot to the calf, is responsible for supporting the foot during movement and holding up the arch. Gradual stretching and tearing of the posterior tibial tendon can cause failure of the ligaments in the arch. Without support, the bones in the feet fall out of normal position, rolling the foot inward. The foot's arch will collapse completely over time, resulting in adult acquired flatfoot.

The ligaments and tendons holding up the arch can lose elasticity and strength as a result of aging. Obesity, diabetes, and hypertension can increase the risk of developing this condition. Adult acquired flatfoot is seen more often in women than in men and in those 40 or older.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Often, this condition is only present in one foot, but it can affect both. Adult acquired flatfoot symptoms vary, but can swelling of the foot's inner side and aching heel and arch pain. Some patients experience no pain, but others may experience severe pain. Symptoms may increase during long periods of standing, resulting in fatigue.

Symptoms may change over time as the condition worsens. The pain may move to the foot's outer side, and some patients may develop arthritis in the ankle and foot.

How is Adult Acquired Flatfoot treated?

This condition may be treated with conservative methods. These can include orthotic devices, special shoes, and bracing. Physical therapy, rest, ice, and anti-inflammatory medication may be prescribed to help relieve symptoms. If the condition is very severe, surgical treatment may be needed.